Issue 135 — 

A-Eye to Sea: Montevideo [artwork] (ArLiJo#135)
D-Digital Anthology [artwork] (ArLiJo#135)
Z-Cass Graybeal Brown [artwork] (ArLiJo#135)
Luis Alberto Ambroggio (ArLiJo#135)
Naomi Ayala (ArLiJo#135)
Lucha Corpi (ArLiJo#135)
Tina Escaja (ArLiJo#135)
Isaac Goldemberg (ArLiJo#135)
Orlando Rossardi (ArLiJo#135)
Raquel Salas Rivera (ArLiJo#135)
Daisy Zamora (ArLiJo#135)
Eye to Sea: Montevideo




Copyright © 2020 by Robert L. Giron.


About the Photographer
Robert L. Giron has had his photography published in regional journals, book covers, and on websites. He is also a poet/writer.
 

 
Featured in ArLiJo Issue No. 135

Poetry Month

Special Bilingual (Spanish/English) Edition
edited by Luis Alberto Ambroggio


A Spanish tradition to celebrate poetry and history, going back to 1571 in what is now Florida and 1598 in what is now El Paso.

Digital Anthology of Hispanic-American Poets of the USA /
Antología Digital de Poetas Hispanoamericanos de los Estados Unidos



Click here to access the PDF:
Digital Anthology of Hispanic-American Poets of the USA / Antología Digital de Poetas Hispanoamericanos de los Estados Unido

Poets in this Digital Anthology
Lucha Corpi
Raquel Salas Rivera
Naomi Ayala
Orlando Rossardi
Tina Escaja
Daisy Zamora
Isaac Goldemberg
Luis Alberto Ambroggio
 

 
Cass Graybeal Brown

Featured in ArLiJo Issue No. 135

Prickly Pear


Copyright © 2020 by Cass Graybeal Brown.


About the Artist
Cass Graybeal Brown is a full-time patent draftsperson and freelance illustrator. Her passion for art started young, fostered by an incredible mother and grandmother who always made it a priority as they moved from naval base to naval base across the world. The many houses they lived in were always filled with magic created from the mundane. This is possibly why her artistic eye zeroed in on scientific illustration while at the Savannah College of Art and Design. Completing a BFA in Illustration and a minor in Scientific Illustration, she graduated Summa Cum Laude in 2017 and specializes in both traditional watercolor and vector technical illustrations. She cultivates a busy freelance career focused on the fight against climate change and for preservation.
 

 
Luis Alberto Ambroggio

Featured in ArLiJo Issue No. 135


About the Author
Luis Alberto Ambroggio is an internationally known Hispanic-American poet, born in Argentina and reborn in the USA. He is the author of twenty collections of poetry, essays, and short stories published in Argentina, Costa Rica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Spain, and the United States, among them We Are All Whitman (University of Houston, Arte Pıblico Press). His poetry has been translated into several languages and has been selected for the Archives of Hispanic Literature of the Library of Congress. Ambroggio has received numerous awards and recognitions such as the Fulbright-Hays Award, Simın Bolıvar Award, Trilce Medal from Instituto Vallejiano, Order of the Discoveries, the Abraham Lincoln Medal and the Excellence Award from the Washington, D.C. Region for his literary and philanthropic contributions. He was nominated for the prestigious Reina Sofia Poetry Award in 2015. Ambroggio holds the honor of having been appointed a member of the Royal Academy of the Spanish Language, North American Academy of the Spanish Language and PEN, the world’s oldest Human Rights organization and the oldest international literary organization.
Visit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luis_Alberto_Ambroggio.
 

 
Naomi Ayala

Featured in ArLiJo Issue No. 135

About the Author
Naomi Ayala has published three books of poetry—Wild Animals on the Moon; This Side of Early; and Calling Home: Praise Songs and Incantations. She is also the translator of Luis Alberto Ambroggio’s La arqueología del viento / The Wind’s Archeology. Naomi has translated and published poems by Lope de Vega as well as the film script for the documentary Every Child is Born a Poet: The Life and Work of Piri Thomas. Her most recent poems appear in Poetry magazine (March 2020) and LatiNEXT (BreakBeat Poets, April 2020). Naomi teaches writing workshops whose emphasis is the development of a daily practice to activate the individual creative process. She has been awarded various prizes and recognitions, including various artist fellowships from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, Special Recognition for Community Service from the U.S. Congress, and the Martin Luther King, Jr. Legacy of Environmental Justice Award.
 

 

Lucha Corpi

Featured in ArLiJo Issue No. 135



About the Author
Born in Mexico, Lucha Corpi came to Berkeley as a student wife in 1964. She is the author of of two collections of poetry: Palabras de mediodía / Noon Words and Variaciones sobre una tempestad / Variations on a Storm (Spanish with English translations by Catherine Rodríguez Nieto); two bilingual children’s books: Where Fireflies Dance / Ahí, donde bailan las luciérnagas and The Triple Banana Split Boy / El niño goloso; six novels: Delia’s Song and five mystery novels, four of which feature Chicana detective Gloria Damasco: Eulogy for a Brown Angel, Cactus Blood, Black Widow’s Wardrobe, and Death at Solstice, and a fifth mystery novel featuring P.I.’s Dora Saldaña and Justin Escobar; a memoir, Confessions of a Book Burner: Personal Essays and Stories was issued in 2014. She has been the recipient of numerous awards and citations, including a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship in poetry and an Oakland Cultural Arts fellowship in narrative, PEN-Oakland Josephine Miles, Multicultural Publishers Exchange Literary Awards; Latino and International Latino Book Awards for her crime fiction, Hispanic Women Making History Award, Poet Laureate at Indiana University Northwest, twice Laureate at the San Francisco Public Library. Her poetry has been translated to French, German and Italian A retired teacher, she resides in Oakland, California.
 

 
Tina Escaja

Featured in ArLiJo Issue No. 135

About the Author
Tina Escaja (Alm@Pérez) is a destructivist/a cyber-poet@, digital artist and Distinguished Professor of Romance Languages and Gender & Women’s Studies at the University of Vermont. As a literary critic, she has published extensively on gender and contemporary Latin American and Spanish poetry and technology. Considered a pioneer in electronic literature, her creative work transcends the traditional book format, leaping into digital art, robotics, augmented reality and multimedia projects exhibited in museums and galleries internationally. Among other recognitions and awards, she received the International Poetry Prize "Dulce María Loynaz" for her collection Caída Libre. Escaja’s poems, fiction and digital work have appeared in numerous collections and have been translated into six languages. Her theater plays have been produced and performed in Taiwan, Mexico, and the US. She is the instigator of the Destructivist/a movement, initiated on the grave of Vicente Huidobro in October of 2014. A selection of Escaja’s works can be experienced at www.tinaescaja.com.
 

 

Isaac Goldemberg

Featured in ArLiJo Issue No. 135


About the Author
Isaac Goldemberg was born in Peru in 1945 and has lived in New York since 1964. He is in the author of four novels, a collection of short fiction, thirteen collections of poetry and three plays. His most recent publications are Libro de reclamaciones (2018), Philosophy and Other Fables (2016), Dialoghi con me e con i miei altri / Diálogos conmigo y mis otros (2015), and Remember the Scorpion (2015). He is also the author of El gran libro de América judía (The Great Book of Jewish America (a 2240-page anthology, 1998). In 1995 his novel The Fragmented Life of Don Jacobo Lerner was selected by a committee of writers and critics as one of the best 25 Peruvian novels of all times and in 2001 a panel of international scholars convened by the National Yiddish Book Center chose it as one of the 100 greatest Jewish books of the last 150 years. His work has been translated into several languages and included in numerous anthologies in Latin America, Europe and the United States. He has received the following awards, among others: the Nuestro Fiction Award (1977), the Nathaniel Judah Jacobson Award (1996), the Estival Theater Award (2003), the Luis Alberto Sánchez Essay Award (2004), the Order of Don Quijote (2005), the Tumi Excellence Award (2014), and the P.E.N. Club of Peru Poetry Award (2015). In 2014, the Casa de la Literatura Peruana (House of Peruvian Literature) in Lima, presented Tiempos y Raíces (Times and Roots), a Homage/Exhibition devoted to his life and works. Goldemberg appears in the list of Most Studied Ibero-American Authors in United States Universities, compiled by the Gale Research Institute. He was director of the New York Latin-American Book Fair (1985-1995), Professor at New York University (1971-1986), and Distinguished Professor of Humanities of The City University of New York at Hostos Community College (1998-2019), where he was the founder-director of the Latin American Writers Institute and the founder-editor of Hostos Review, an international journal of culture. He is also a Fellow Member of the North American Academy of the Spanish Language and Honorary Professor of the Ricardo Palma University in Lima, Peru.
 

 
Orlando Rossardi

Featured in ArLiJo Issue No. 135

About the Author
Orlando Rossardi (pseudonym of Orlando Rodríguez Sardiñas) was born in Havana, Cuba in 1938. He left the island in 1960, and has since been living in Spain and in the United States. He obtained a Ph.D. at the University of Texas, Austin, and taught at the University of New Hampshire, Wisconsin and Miami Dade College in Florida. He began working in 1984 for Radio Martí in Washington, D.C, and later at their office in Miami, Florida, as programming coordinator and subsequently deputy director, dedicating twenty years of his life to the broadcasting services of the United States Government.

Orlando Rossardi published primarily poetry and his collections include El Diámetro y lo Estero (1964), Que voy de vuelo (1970), Los espacios llenos (1991), Memoria de mí; (1996), Los pies en la tierra (2006), Libro de las pérdidas (2008), Casi la voz (2009), Canto en la Florida (2010), Fundación del centro (2011) and Totalidad (2012).

His anthology, La última poesíba cubana (1973), is considered by critics the first major work bringing together the Cuban poets both from the island and from exile.

His other works include six volumes of Historia de la Literatura Hispanoamericana Contemporánea (1976) the three volumes on Teatro Selecto Hispanoamericano Contemporáneo (1971), as well as an essay on the Colombian avant garde poet León de Greiff: una poética de vanguardia (1974).

Rossardi is a member of the North American Academy of the Spanish Language (Academia Norteamericana de la Lengua Española) and Correspondent of the Royal Academy of the Spanish Language in Madrid, Spain. His research contributions can be found in encyclopedias, dictionaries, and literary magazines in Spain and Latin America as well as in the United States.
 

 


Raquel Salas Rivera

Featured in ArLiJo Issue No. 135

About the Author
Raqel Salas Rivera (Mayagüez, 1985) is a Puerto Rican poet, translator, and literary critic. In 2018, they were named the Poet Laureate of Philadelphia for a two-year term. The following year they became the inaugural recipient of the Laureate Fellowship from the Academy of American Poets and won the New Voices Award from Puerto Rico’s Festival de la Palabra. Their third book, lo terciario / the tertiary (2nd ed., Noemi Press, 2019), was on the 2018 National Book Award Longlist and won the 2018 Lambda Literary Award for Transgender Poetry. Their fifth book, x/ex/exis: poemas para la nación/ poems for the nation was the first recipient of the Ambroggio Prize (Editorial Bilingüe/ Bilingual Press, 2020).
 

 

Daisy Zamora

Featured in ArLiJo Issue No. 135

About the Author
Nicaraguan writer and poet, prominent in contemporary Latin American literature. Author of numerous poetry books in Spanish, and several translated collections in the United States and England, she also edited the first comprehensive anthology of Nicaraguan women poets published in Latin America. Her essays, articles, and translations have been widely published, and her poetry appears in anthologies in thirty languages, including the Oxford Book of Latin American Poetry. Her latest poetry collection, La violenta espuma, was published in 2018 by Visor Libros (Spain). Her awards include the Mariano Fiallos Gil National Poetry Prize of Nicaragua, and a California Arts Council Fellowship. She has given poetry readings and lectures throughout the world, including many venues in the U.S. Zamora was recently featured in director Jenny Murray’s award winning documentary ¡Las Sandinistas!, and was a featured poet in Bill Moyer’s PBS series The Language of Life. She teaches at San Francisco State University, and is married to U.S. writer George Evans.